Saehltien Raejnoemaennien Soptsestimmieh

I'm a Swedish South Saami and Scottish Gaelic man based in the part of Saepmie currently occupied by the Swedish State. I guess I could best describe myself as an Indigenous scholar, activist, language rights advocate, translator and teacher.

Sigyn and her husband, the captured Lóki
I would like to make it clear that Þórr, the Old Norse, ginger god of thunder, was not a blond, American hulk and Lóki was most certainly not his adoptive brother.
While Marvel uses tropes from the Edda, it should be said that the real story is far more interesting than any Marvel story could ever be, what with everything from Lóki’s beginning to his end being highly interesting.
Let’s start with Lóki’s birth, and event that was the result of the giant Fárbauti impregnating the giantess Laufey with a lightning bolt (and the cruel striker, as lightning would hit the leaves). Yes, his mother was a giant leaf and his father a cruel lightning bolt. This, however, did not stop him from being raised as a giant of great powers, with, among other things, the ability to shape-shift. Into literally anything.
I guess the main reason as to why I find Lóki to be interesting, is mainly because of the fact that he manages to combine being both a complete and utter wanker as well as a wonderfully clever and resourceful giant; As one of Oðínn’s foster brothers, our giant, which is describes as somewhat of a hunk by Snórri Sturlausson, causes as much trouble as he creates good things.
Take the building of Valhall as an example; at first Lóki is clever enough to trick the gods into hiring an unnamed builder with a magical horse called Svaðilfári to build the fortification in exchange for the sun, the moon and the goddess Freyja if he manages to finish the building within three seasons. The horse, of course, helps the giant so that he almost manages to succeed with his quest, but, after Lóki has been threatened with death, he transforms himself into a mare and lures away the giant’s horse, leading to the giant failing his quest and Lóki later giving birth to Oðínn’s horse Sleipnir.
In other words, giant horses can be distracted with sex. 
Then there’s the time when Lóki impregnates the giantess Angrboða and thus becomes the father of Jærmungandr, the Midgard Serpent who holds the fate of the world, Hel, one of many rulers of Death and Fenrir, a monstrous wolf that bites of Þyrr’s hand and swallows Oðínn in Ragnarök, i.e. the end of the world. He is also the father of Nari, whose entrails are turned into iron and used to bind Lóki to a cliff to punish him for all his crimes. 
And, indeed, Lóki is indeed a trouble-maker, but it is important to remember that he successfully manages to combine his practical jokes with his all-encompassing awesomeness. Indeed, after having cut of Þórr’s wife’s Síf’s hair, he manages to trick the dwarves Eitre and Brókk into creating a new head of golden hair for her. But this is far from all the things Lóki fools the twin dwarves into making - as a result of a bet, the dwarves also make Freyr’s ship Skíðblaðnir, which is the world’s best ship and which conveniently enough can be folded and put into one’s pocket. They also make Oðínn’s spear Gungnir which never misses its target, Gullinbursti, i.e. a golden boar which is slaughtered each night and fed to the warriors in Valhall only to come alive again the morning after, Draupnír, which is a golden ring which drops eight identical rings from itself every ninth night and, not to be forgotten. Asgárd’s most important artefact, i.e. Þórr’s hammer Mjólnir, which is used to kill giants and protect the home of the Æsir.
In many ways, Lóki could have been one of the best gods, but it is finally his betrayal of the Æsir through the murder of Balðr - i.e. Oðinn’s and Frigg’s son - through  the fooling of a blind god into shooting this Norse Achilles/Jesus figure with an arrow made of a yew tree, i.e. the only thing that could kill him, that makes him an all in all evil bastard with a few redeaming qualities, rather than a good guy with a number of bad qualities.
Never fear though, Lóki is naturally punished for his crime - his son Nári is killed by a werewolf and the son’s entrails are then used to chain our mischievous giant god to a rock with three edges cutting into his neck, back and lower back, with his eyes held open so that a serpent placed there by the goddess Skáðí can drop venom into them. Lóki’s wife naturally disapproves of this punishment, and the only reason as to why we’re not having eternal earthquakes created by the giant god’s pains, so the Vikings, comes down to the fakt that Lóki’s wife Sigyn collects the serpent’s venom in a bowl, day in and out until the onset of Ragnarök.
And, glory halleluiah, bring on the end of the world; Lóki, now somewhat pissed off with the gods is released and uses his monster children and an army of giants to bring an end to the world. He, himself, manages to kill the gods’ protector Heimðalr in the ongoing chaos, only to end up being killed by the very same god in the end.

Sigyn and her husband, the captured Lóki

I would like to make it clear that Þórr, the Old Norse, ginger god of thunder, was not a blond, American hulk and Lóki was most certainly not his adoptive brother.

While Marvel uses tropes from the Edda, it should be said that the real story is far more interesting than any Marvel story could ever be, what with everything from Lóki’s beginning to his end being highly interesting.

Let’s start with Lóki’s birth, and event that was the result of the giant Fárbauti impregnating the giantess Laufey with a lightning bolt (and the cruel striker, as lightning would hit the leaves). Yes, his mother was a giant leaf and his father a cruel lightning bolt. This, however, did not stop him from being raised as a giant of great powers, with, among other things, the ability to shape-shift. Into literally anything.

I guess the main reason as to why I find Lóki to be interesting, is mainly because of the fact that he manages to combine being both a complete and utter wanker as well as a wonderfully clever and resourceful giant; As one of Oðínn’s foster brothers, our giant, which is describes as somewhat of a hunk by Snórri Sturlausson, causes as much trouble as he creates good things.

Take the building of Valhall as an example; at first Lóki is clever enough to trick the gods into hiring an unnamed builder with a magical horse called Svaðilfári to build the fortification in exchange for the sun, the moon and the goddess Freyja if he manages to finish the building within three seasons. The horse, of course, helps the giant so that he almost manages to succeed with his quest, but, after Lóki has been threatened with death, he transforms himself into a mare and lures away the giant’s horse, leading to the giant failing his quest and Lóki later giving birth to Oðínn’s horse Sleipnir.

In other words, giant horses can be distracted with sex. 

Then there’s the time when Lóki impregnates the giantess Angrboða and thus becomes the father of Jærmungandr, the Midgard Serpent who holds the fate of the world, Hel, one of many rulers of Death and Fenrir, a monstrous wolf that bites of Þyrr’s hand and swallows Oðínn in Ragnarök, i.e. the end of the world. He is also the father of Nari, whose entrails are turned into iron and used to bind Lóki to a cliff to punish him for all his crimes.

And, indeed, Lóki is indeed a trouble-maker, but it is important to remember that he successfully manages to combine his practical jokes with his all-encompassing awesomeness. Indeed, after having cut of Þórr’s wife’s Síf’s hair, he manages to trick the dwarves Eitre and Brókk into creating a new head of golden hair for her. But this is far from all the things Lóki fools the twin dwarves into making - as a result of a bet, the dwarves also make Freyr’s ship Skíðblaðnir, which is the world’s best ship and which conveniently enough can be folded and put into one’s pocket. They also make Oðínn’s spear Gungnir which never misses its target, Gullinbursti, i.e. a golden boar which is slaughtered each night and fed to the warriors in Valhall only to come alive again the morning after, Draupnír, which is a golden ring which drops eight identical rings from itself every ninth night and, not to be forgotten. Asgárd’s most important artefact, i.e. Þórr’s hammer Mjólnir, which is used to kill giants and protect the home of the Æsir.

In many ways, Lóki could have been one of the best gods, but it is finally his betrayal of the Æsir through the murder of Balðr - i.e. Oðinn’s and Frigg’s son - through  the fooling of a blind god into shooting this Norse Achilles/Jesus figure with an arrow made of a yew tree, i.e. the only thing that could kill him, that makes him an all in all evil bastard with a few redeaming qualities, rather than a good guy with a number of bad qualities.

Never fear though, Lóki is naturally punished for his crime - his son Nári is killed by a werewolf and the son’s entrails are then used to chain our mischievous giant god to a rock with three edges cutting into his neck, back and lower back, with his eyes held open so that a serpent placed there by the goddess Skáðí can drop venom into them. Lóki’s wife naturally disapproves of this punishment, and the only reason as to why we’re not having eternal earthquakes created by the giant god’s pains, so the Vikings, comes down to the fakt that Lóki’s wife Sigyn collects the serpent’s venom in a bowl, day in and out until the onset of Ragnarök.

And, glory halleluiah, bring on the end of the world; Lóki, now somewhat pissed off with the gods is released and uses his monster children and an army of giants to bring an end to the world. He, himself, manages to kill the gods’ protector Heimðalr in the ongoing chaos, only to end up being killed by the very same god in the end.